Louisiana Voodoo Religion History and New Orleans Voodoo

Louisiana Voodoo Religion History and New Orleans Voodoo

Louisiana Voodoo religion history and the roots of Voodoo in New Orleans by Erzulie’s Voodoo in the French Quarter of New Orleans.  We are proud bring you this introduction on the Voodoo Religion as it is practiced in Louisiana and New Orleans.

This overview of the Louisiana Voodoo religion and New Orleans Voodoo is not intended to cover the entire and vast history of New Orleans and the Voodoo religion. It is to provide a glimpse into the history and an educational overview on the roots, magic, myths, and legendary practitioners who influenced the distinct Voodoo religion of Louisiana and New Orleans, a religion which is still practiced today.

To learn more about the Louisiana Voodoo religion and New Orleans Voodoo History, Roots of the Vodou Religion, Vodou Beliefs and Marie Laveau the New Orleans Voodoo Queen, browse our vast collection of educational articles prepared by caring, initiated Vodou practitioners at Erzulie’s.   Because of these deep and magical roots of the Voodoo, learn what a psychic reading or spiritual consultation with an initiated Vodou practitioner can provide you in your spiritual session with this informative article. Alafia from all of us at Erzulie’s in New Orleans! Continue reading “Louisiana Voodoo Religion History and New Orleans Voodoo”

Marie Laveau New Orleans Voodoo Queen

Marie Laveau and all about the New Orleans Voodoo Queen!

The Voodoo Queen of New Orleans Marie Laveau! In all times, in all places, no one has ever risen to the statue or fame in Voodoo as Marie Laveau. Famed in history, infamous in folklore and ever present, even today.  Marie Catherine Laveau was born in New Orleans on September 10, 1801. She was the natural daughter of two free persons of color, both mulattos. She was a free woman of color and a Creole. She was married to Jacques Paris in 1819 at the St. Louis Cathedral with the famed Père Antoine officiating. Article courtesy of our dearly missed friend John, curator of the New Orleans Voodoo Museum! May he rest in peace.

She had two children, both of whom appear to have died before reaching maturity. With a few years, her husband apparently also died she began calling herself the Widow Paris, a name that survived onto her tomb. Around the mid 1820’s she began a plaçage with Louis Christophe Dominick Duminy de Glapion with who she bore seven more children. (The plaçage system afforded interracial couples a marriage of conscience, if not legality).

Continue reading “Marie Laveau New Orleans Voodoo Queen”

What You Should Know About Marie Laveau ~ Voodoo Queen of New Orleans

New Orleans Voodoo Queen Marie Laveau! Brief History of Marie Laveau – The New Orleans Voodoo Queen!

What you should know about New Orleans Voodoo and New Orleans Voodoo Queen, Marie Laveau!  Another Voodoo history segment from Priestess Kalila Smith‘s research and published chapters on Voodoo In New Orleans and our beloved Voodoo Queen, Marie Laveau! The most noted Queen of Voodoo was Marie Laveau. She was born in 1783, to Marguerite Darcantel, a slave from Haiti and mistress of a wealthy plantation owner, a Frenchman, Charles Laveau. In the 1700 & 1800’s, French aristocratic men often took women of color as mistresses in a custom called placage.

In the placage arrangement, children of the union had right of heir ship and bore the father’s name. No doubt in this sort of arrangement, the children would also be reared in their fathers’ religion, Catholicism. Marie was raised in her father’s plantation. She was educated and studied to be a hairdresser. She was a devout Catholic, who went to mass everyday of her life. She was a dark skinned woman with long black hair that she frequently wore in a single braid making her look much like an Indian or a Gypsy, probably adding to her mystique.

Continue reading “What You Should Know About Marie Laveau ~ Voodoo Queen of New Orleans”

History of New Orleans Voodoo

New Orleans Voodoo History and New Orleans Voodoo Information ~ The History of Voodoo in New Orleans by Voodoo Priestess, Ms. Kalila Smith

New Orleans Voodoo and New Orleans Voodoo History ~ Ms. Kalila Smith, native New Orleans Voodoo Priestess and practitioner, provides us a glimpse into the history of Voodoo in New Orleans. The roots of Voodoo have been traced all the way back to Africa thousands of years ago. In his book, A Brief History of Voodoo: Slavery & the Survival of The African Gods, Mr. Andy Antippas gives an overview of this fascinating history. The Yoruba people of Southwestern and eastern Dahomey and Togo/Nigeria founded a great city called Ife. It is from the religious beliefs of Ife that Voodoo as we know it today has evolved.

In 1799, a slave uprising in Haiti brought the Free People of Color and their Voodoo religion. These people had no reason to believe that they could not come to this city and worship freely. The first Voodoo Queen in New Orleans was Sanite’ DeDe, a young woman who bought her way to freedom, she would later be teacher and mentor to the most famous Voodoo Queen, Marie Laveau! She would hold rituals in her courtyard on Dumaine (the same street Erzulie’s is located) and Chartres Streets, just blocks away from the Cathedral.

Continue reading “History of New Orleans Voodoo”

Voodoo Queen Marie Laveau

New Orleans Voodoo Queen Marie Laveau! A Brief History of Marie Laveau – The New Orleans Voodoo Queen!

New Orleans Voodoo and New Orleans Voodoo Queen, Marie Laveau!  Another Voodoo history segment from native New Orleans Voodoo Priestess Kalila Smith‘s research and published chapters on Voodoo In New Orleans and our beloved Voodoo Queen, Marie Laveau! The most noted Queen of Voodoo was Marie Laveau. She was born in 1783, to Marguerite Darcantel, a slave from Haiti and mistress of a wealthy plantation owner, a Frenchman, Charles Laveau. In the 1700 & 1800’s, French aristocratic men often took women of color as mistresses in a custom called placage. In the placage arrangement, children of the union had right of heir ship and bore the father’s name. No doubt in this sort of arrangement, the children would also be reared in their fathers’ religion, Catholicism. Marie was raised in her father’s plantation. She was educated and studied to be a hairdresser. She was a devout Catholic, who went to mass everyday of her life. She was a dark skinned woman with long black hair that she frequently wore in a single braid making her look much like an Indian or a Gypsy, probably adding to her mystique.

Continue reading “Voodoo Queen Marie Laveau”